Meet Us At the ACTFL Digital Badge Booth!

Meet Us At the ACTFL Digital Badge Booth!

The ACTFL 2013 Convention Network is growing — more than 450 attendees have signed up to earn a digital badge for engaging and sharing professional interests with the foreign language community. How can you join in? Go to the ACTFL Digital Badges site and click Become a Convention Networker to sign up. Then follow the steps to earning your ACTFL professional development badge, like these 21st century FL professionals:

Why Digital Badges?

COERLL partnered with ACTFL to bring you this badge-earning opportunity because we see the potential for digital badges as an alternative and effective method of credentialing and tracking professional development. In our Fall 2013 newsletter, Digital Badges for an Open World, we enlisted leaders in this movement to help us vision cast the future of digital badges.

In the newsletter, Evan Rubin, Director of Instructional Technology at LARC (our partners in FL digital badge initiatives) shares:

evan“I have very high expectations for badges in foreign languages. I imagine badges taking on gamified elements, where leaderboards will highlight high achievers. General statistics about any individual’s activity and performance could be accessed. I envision a community of practice in which participants will be proud to share their badges online, and where a sense of fun and friendly competition will motivate language professionals to create their own online personal learning networks (PLNs). …

Badges serve educators by allowing them to pursue a professional development agenda that is more customizable in every respect, without losing an ounce of rigor, but rather offering the possibility of a more interactive and more rigorous, continuing education.

Badges can serve administrators by providing the opportunity for faculty to design and deliver a professional development agenda, while still allowing them to vet and verify the status and standing of any current or prospective teacher on their staff. This goal will lead us into the future.”

You can join Evan and hundreds of other Convention Networkers who will be making meaningful connections at ACFTL 2013 and earning their very own digital badge. Go to actflbadges.org.

And when you arrive at the convention in Orlando, come see us at the Digital Badge booth. Find out more about how it works and meet other Convention Networkers f2f!

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Also, please stop by the COERLL booth to find out about our open (free) educational resources and professional development for FL education:

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Make Professional Connections With Digital Badges

Make Professional Connections With Digital Badges

Today, we’ll hear from Abby Dings, Associate Professor and Coordinator of the Spanish Language Program at Southwestern University, about digital badges for growing your professional network.

DingsDigital badges are poised to play a central role in Continuing Professional Education for language educators. Digital badges allow educators to explore areas that interest them, and to join peer communities focused on similar topics. The opportunities for networking and sharing expertise and ideas are valuable aspects of many badge challenges.”

See COERLL’s Fall 2013 newsletter for the full text. Abby is co-developer of a badge system to work in conjunction with the Spanish Corpus Proficiency Level Training website.

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Earn a Digital Badge at ACTFL 2013

The ACFTL 2013 Convention Networker badge is a great example of how digital badges increase your professional exposure and create interest-specific connections.

Connect with Abby Dings and other language professionals who have joined the Convention Network so far. Search for members with common professional interests or languages. Then click Become a Convention Networker to begin making meaningful and lasting connections with your ACTFL colleagues!

 

Digital Badges Showcase Your Achievements

Digital Badges Showcase Your Achievements

ACTFL-digital-badgeAs part of our digital badge education series leading up to the ACTFL 2013 Convention, we’d like you to hear from teachers, administrators and other foreign language professionals about why badges matter.

First, a quick crash course on digital badges as a growing and effective means of showcasing your professional achievements …

411 On Digital Badges
  • Badge issuers include universities, professional organizations and language resource centers.
  • Badge earners can display these digital representations of professional development on personal websites, Facebook pages or wikispaces. Visit  openbadges.org to learn how to display your digital badges online.

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  •  Viewers (e.g. peers, employers) who click on the digital badge can see important information, including the badge issuer and a course description. Viewers also see what the badge represents, including achievements, skills, competencies, community involvement, CPE credits earned, evidence for formal or informal learning, links to portfolio work and other details reflecting the merit of the badge.

In COERLL’s Fall 2013 newsletter, Austin ISD World Languages Coordinator Tina Dong talked about how digital badges could make a difference for the teachers she evaluates:

COERLL_TDong_091613“I see potential for badges to be a reflection of a teacher’s language proficiency, their ability to differentiate instruction or to integrate 21st century skills and their knowledge of how to embed culture into instruction. In addition to teachers having an innovative way to visually display such attainments, it would help me determine which teachers can lead professional development workshops in certain areas.”

See the newsletter for the full text.

ACTFL 2013 attendees can go to actflbadges.org to earn a Convention Networker badge today! Connect with Tina Dong and other language professionals in the network.

Maximize Your ACTFL 2013 Convention Experience — Earn A Digital Badge

Maximize Your ACTFL 2013 Convention Experience — Earn A Digital Badge

If you’re attending the 2013 ACTFL convention in Orlando, we wanted to let you know about an exciting opportunity to earn a digital badge called the “Convention Networker.”

ACTFL-digital-badgeCOERLL and ACTFL have partnered together to develop this badge to showcase your efforts in connecting and networking with other convention attendees — f2f and through social media. Why is this important? Digital badges are fast becoming the means of showcasing professional experience and knowledge.

 

Watch this video for a quick ramp-up on badges:

 

ACTFL President and Loveland High School French teacher Toni Theisen recently shared her excitement about badges in COERLL’s Fall 2013 newsletter:

COERLL-Newsletter-Fall2#1B0“I want ACTFL members to learn about the badge concept and the potential of recognizing their skills and expertise at a more detailed level. This is why we are partnering with COERLL to present the first ever ACTFL badge. ACTFL can lead the way for developing ideas of using badges to recognize many possibilities of professional teaching and learning through multiple paths of credentialing.”

See COERLL’s Fall 2013 newsletter for the full text.

Then visit www.actflbadges.org to sign up and find out what you need to do to earn your ACTFL 2013 digital badge.

Leading up to the convention, stay tuned to learn more about the potential of digital badges for foreign language professionals.

Language Classrooms Are Opening Up

Language Classrooms Are Opening Up

From the editor: On this European Day of Languages, we are happy to announce the publication of Case Studies of Openness in the Language Classroom, co-edited by Open Up contributors Barbara Sawhill and Ana Beaven, with third co-editor Anna Comas-Quinn (The Open University, UK). The book itself is an open resource and available for free download. COERLL Director Carl Blyth contributes a case study on eComma, an open application for social reading. And frequent Open Up contributor Todd Bryant presents a chapter on his free language exchange website, The Mixxer. Please see the press release below for more details.

Case studiesCase Studies of Openness in the Language Classroom is a compilation of case studies written by practitioners in different educational settings who are exploring the concept of openness in language teaching and learning.

The idea for this volume emerged during the conference “Learning through Sharing: Open Resources, Open Practices, Open Communication,” organised by the EUROCALL Teacher Education and Computer Mediated Communication (CMC) Special Interest Groups at the University of Bologna (Italy) in March 2012.

“We felt that there was a real need to make visible the work that individuals across the globe are doing in this area,” said Ana Beaven, co-editor. “It was important to provide an open way to share those practices with others.

The book is structured in five sections, covering open tools for collaboration, sharing resources, sharing practices, collaborative learning and student-generated content, and learner autonomy. “We hope it will provide ideas for language teachers who might want to dip their toes into the world of Open Educational Resources (OER) and Open Educational Practices (OEP), or maybe experiment further,” commented Anna Comas-Quinn, co-editor.

“Attending the conference in Bologna was an eye-opening experience for me as a language teacher and technologist working in the US.  I realized quite quickly how US-centric my knowledge of my profession had become, and how much I had to learn from the work of my colleagues in other countries,” said Barbara Sawhill, co-editor.  “This volume does a great job of sharing the diversity of ideas and practices about the ideas of OERs and OEP across many countries and institutions.”

Download the book free of charge. In October 2013, the publication will available on Google Books full view. You can also purchase a Kindle edition from Amazon, and as a black and white paperback from Lulu (with 20% discount) or from Amazon (starting in October).

Co-editors:

Ana Beaven (Università di Bologna, Italy)
Anna Comas-Quinn (The Open University, UK)
Barbara Sawhill (Oberlin College, Ohio, USA)

Contributors:

Ana Beaven (Università di Bologna, Italy)
Carl Blyth (University of Texas at Austin, USA)
Kate Borthwick (University of Southampton, UK)
Todd Bryant (Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, USA)
Anna Calvi (The Open University, UK)
Marco Cappellini (Lille 3 University, France)
Alison Dickens (University of Southampton, UK)
Annette Duensing (The Open University in the East, UK)
Matilde Gallardo (The Open University in the South East, UK);
Cecilia Goria (University of Nottingham, UK)
Sarah Heiser (The Open University in London, UK)
María Dolores Iglesias Mora (The Open University, UK)
Terry King (UCL, UK)
David Elvis Leeming (University of Central Lancashire, UK)
Antonio Martínez-Arboleda (University of Leeds, UK)
Anna Motzo (The Open University, UK)
Irina Nelson (University of Southampton, UK)
Alicia Pozo-Gutiérrez (University of Southampton, UK)
Klaus-Dieter Rossade (The Open University, UK)
Barbara Sawhill (Oberlin College, Ohio, USA)
Sandra Silipo (The Open University, UK)
Julie Watson (University of Southampton, UK)
Susanne Winchester (The Open University, UK).

The Rise of Badges

The Rise of Badges

Open Up will be taking a short break, but you can expect to hear about exciting events and new OER offerings from us in the fall. This year, our focus will be on the progress of digital badges for alternative credentials in foreign language education.

Digital badges allow language educators to earn credentials for the 21st century classroom and share them with the world. Here’s a quick intro:

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We’ll be creating a badge opportunity for you at this year’s ACTFL conference, so be sure to participate and see how you can get involved in this growing movement.

Building Community at AATSP

Building Community at AATSP

Conferences are a great place to talk to teachers and hear what’s on their minds.  The Spanish and Portuguese teachers at the AATSP conference in San Antonio gave us lots of terrific ideas. Here are a few:

Ann Mar, a high school AP Spanish teacher from San Antonio, told us that she had recently become aware of COERLL’s SpinTX Video Archive.  She was excited to discover that it  closely aligns with the new AP Spanish curriculum scheduled to begin this fall.  The AP Spanish Language and Culture Course is a national curriculum set by the College Board. Ann told us that there are 6 themes within the new curriculum  that match up well with the themes in the SpinTX videos ( e.g. “Personal and Public Identities”, “Families and Communities”,  “Contemporary Life”).

Ann has already posted a link to SpinTX in the AP teacher community forum. She will also be running a summer institute for AP Spanish teachers at UT Austin later in July. Finally, she is  interested in having her high school students in San Antonio collect videos using our protocols, with the idea that we could use them as part of the corpus if they turn out well.  So, it looks like COERLL will definitely be exploring how to  connect our video archive to the AP Spanish curriculum with Ann’s help.  Thanks, Ann!

Another terrific idea came from  Dr. Margo Milleret from the Portuguese program at the University of New Mexico. Margo suggested that COERLL consider developing badges aimed at middle or high school students based on our introductory LCTL resources. Badges are a way to recognize and verify online learning. The goal would be to expose students to languages that aren’t normally offered in high schools (such as Portuguese), so that when the students go to college, they would be more likely to study a LCTL.  She noted that while she doesn’t have the resources to do something like this herself, she would really like to collaborate with a center like COERLL and other  K-12 teachers to make it happen.  Margo’s great idea combines various elements of COERLL’s mission:  K-12, LCTLs, and Open Education.

And finally, another good idea came from ACTFL president Toni Theisen. Toni was chatting with us at the COERLL booth about the tremendous potential of badges for teacher development.  She wondered whether COERLL could help ACTFL award attendees of this year’s convention in Orlando with a participation badge.  Great idea, Toni! That would certainly help bring badges to the attention of the foreign language teaching community.  Let’s work on this … together.

Open Education is fundamentally about sharing.  So a big “Thank You” to all the teachers who shared their  ideas with us at AATSP.

Carl BlythCarl Blyth is Director of COERLL and Associate Professor of French, UT Austin.  His research includes CMC,  cross-cultural and intercultural pragmatics, interactional sociolinguistics, and pedagogical grammar.  He is project director of eComma, an open-source annotation application to facilitate more “social” forms of reading.

 

 

Meet the iTunes U Language Learner

Meet the iTunes U Language Learner

Have you ever wondered about those students who are learning foreign languages on iTunes? There are over 600 free language learning collections on iTunes. People are using them. What do you know about these students?

Earlier this year, I presented a paper at the e-Learning Symposium in Southampton University in the UK about the iTunes U language learner. I wanted to share the results with you. The findings show that most iTunes U learners have quite a different profile compared to university learners: from their age and gender to their occupation and motivations for accessing iTunes U language resources.

Before watching, think about who you think the iTunes U language learner is. Mostly male? Mostly female? How old? What do they do? Do they listen on mobile devices or on their home computers? Do they think they are learning by engaging with the language resources they download from iTunes U? And what implications do the answers to these questions have for the design and implementation of iTunes U resources from your own institution?

Now watch the presentation.

How do your answers to the questions above compare with the actual results? Feel free to comment on your impressions and implications for teaching and learning through iTunes U.

Fernando Rosell-AguilarFernando Rosell-Aguilar is a lecturer in Spanish and coordinator of iTunes U content for the Department of Languages at the Open University, UK.

Read more about open language learning on iTunes.

 

Shareworthy: COERLL’s Webinar Series

Shareworthy: COERLL’s Webinar Series

Your foreign language department will thank you for sharing COERLL’s Webinar Series, all about open educational resources (OER) for language learning. Here’s what we covered:

Finding Open Media for Foreign Language Instruction Learn how to search for and find high-quality authentic OER (multimedia, realia, interviews, etc.) for use in language teaching and learning.

 

The Practice of Using and Teaching with OER Explore the practice of implementing OER into teaching and learn specifically about integration of COERLL’s popular French curriculum, Francais interactif, into foreign language classrooms.

 

Focus on SpinTX: An Open Video Archive for Language Learning We unpack one of our most recent projects, SpinTX–a resource for bilingual Spanish speakers in Texas. Learn how to search and tag videos for features that match your interests, and create and share your favorite playlists.

 

Why Foreign Language Grad Programs Should Care About OER

Why Foreign Language Grad Programs Should Care About OER

Discussions about the future of OER often seem to center on issues of promotion and tenure and on finding viable business models for  for large-scale projects. While these are certainly issues for which solutions need to be found, our desire to institutionalize and commodify OER must not crowd out consideration of the pedagogical opportunities that OER can provide to graduate programs.

Digital Humanities and CALL

We are in an age in which graduate programs are thinking about alternatives to the dissertation and Digital Humanists are calling for project-based scholarship for graduate students. Work on OER can facilitate this new kind of graduate training, creating a focus for discussions of content as well as curricular design, and providing hands-on experience in issues of CALL (Computer Assisted Language Learning) for a generation of teachers who will be expected to work increasingly in online and hybrid formats.

Creating a Knowledge Ecosystem

Rather than focusing exclusively on single-author articles and monographs, couldn’t graduate students also collaborate on materials for classroom use? Think of the vast array of materials that such an army of graduate students could produce, and the praise it might garner from legislators seeking to lower the cost of higher education. Think about the “knowledge ecosystem” that this small change could help create, and the ripple effects that a cohort so young could have over time. (See Making Collaboration Easier to watch Rich Baraniuk talk more about the knowledge ecosystem.)

What do you think? Could embracing Open Access and technological literacy as integral parts of graduate studies better prepare both the future professoriate and the growing number of alternative academics being produced by our graduate programs?

Jon perkinsJonathan Perkins is the Director of the Ermal Garinger Academic Resource Center at the University of Kansas. His research interests include Computer Assisted Language Learning, instructional technology and faculty development.